ITAMP Workshop

Cold Alkaline-Earth Atoms

Organizers: Paul Julienne, Kalle-Antii Suominen, Nils Andersen

September 7-9, 2000

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 Online Talks

 Participants

 Abstracts

 Schedule of Talks

Online Talks

Cruz

Derevianko

Gallagher

Greene

Hemmerich

Julienne

Katori

 Kotochigova

 Machholm

Oates

Rasel

Riehle

Stwalley

Suominen

Thomsen

Tiemann

       

Participants

 
Prof. Nils Andersen
Director
Niels Bohr Institute for Astronomy, Physics and    Geophysics
Blegdamsvej 17
2100 Copenhagen 0 Denmark
noa@amo.fys.ku.dk
 
Prof. Flavio C. Cruz
Universidade Estadual de Campinas
UNICAMP-IFGW-DEQ
CP.6165
Campinas, SP, 13083-970, Brazil
flavio@ifi.unicamp.br

Dr. Andrei Derevianko
ITAMP
60 Garden Street, MS 14
Cambridge, MA 02138
aderevianko@cfa.harvard.edu

Dr. Alan C. Gallagher
JILA
University of Colorado
Boulder, Colorado 80309-0440
alang@jila.colorado.edu

Prof. Chris H. Greene
JILA
University of Colorado
Boulder, Colorado 80309-0440
Chg@Jila.Colorado.Edu

Professor Andreas Hemmerich
Institut fuer Laser-Physi
Universitaet Hamburg
Jungiusstr.9,
20355 Hamburg, Germany
andreas.hemmerich@physnet.uni-hamburg.de

Dr. Paul Julienne
National Institute of Standards and Technology
100 Bureau Drive Stop 8423
Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8423
paul.julienne@nist.gov

Dr. Hidetoshi Katori
KSP D Bldg., 8F
3-2-1 Sakado,Kawasaki
Kanagawa 213-0012, Japan
katori@mx.ksp.or.jp

Dr. Svetlana A. Kotochigova
National Institute of Standards and Technology
Bldg. 221, Rm. A155
100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8424
Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8424
svetlana.kotochigova@nist.gov

Dr. Mette Machholm
Department of Computational Science
National University of Singapore,
Blk S17 Level 7, 3 Science Drive 2
Singapore 117543
machholm@cz3.nus.edu.sg

Dr. Chris Oates
Time and Frequency Division
NIST
Mailcode 847.00
325 Broadway
Boulder, CO 80303
oates@boulder.nist.gov

Dr. Ernst Rasel
Institut fuer Quantenoptik
Universitaet Hannover
Welfengarten 1
30167 Hannover Germany
rasel@iqo.uni-hannover.de

Dr. Fritz W. Riehle
Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt
Bundesallee 100
D-38116 Braunschweig, Germany
Fritz.Riehle@ptb.de

Professor William C. Stwalley
Physics Department
University of Connecticut U-46
2152 Hillside Road
Storrs, CT 06269-3046
stwalley@uconnvm.uconn.edu

Prof. Kalle-Antti Suominen
Helsinki Institute of Physics
PL 9
FIN-00014 Helsingin yliopisto
Finland
Kalle-Antti.Suominen@csc.fi

Dr. Jan Thomsen
Oersted Laboratory
Universitetsparken 5
2100 Copenhagen 0 Denmark
jwt@fys.ku.dk

Prof. Eberhard Tiemann
Institut für Quantenoptik
Universität Hannover
Welfengarten 1
D-30167 Hannover, Germany
tiemann@iqo.uni-hannover.de

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Abstracts

Cruz

Derevianko

Gallagher

Greene

Hemmerich

Julienne

Katori

 Kotochigova

 Machholm

Oates

Rasel

Riehle

Stwalley

Suominen

Thomsen

Tiemann

       

 A System for Cooling and Trapping of Calcium

Flavio C. Cruz

Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin
Universidade Estadual de Campinas
CP.6165, Campinas, SP, 13083-970, Brazil

I will describe our progress towards the development of a system for laser cooling and trapping of calcium. A calcium beam is decelerated by the Zeeman tuning technique and then trapped in a MOT, using light at 423 nm in resonance with the strong 1S0-1P1 transition. The experimental setup includes: 423 nm light sources based on diode lasers and a Ti:sapphire laser; a glass apparatus for the atomic beam and MOT; a deceleration coil which allows changes in the field profile; and hollow-cathode lamps for detection of weak transitions, like the intercombination one at 657 nm. To interrogate this transition, we are initially investigating and comparing two independent diode lasers locked to low finesse cavities. Some of our interests include the development of optical frequency standards, precise measurements and studies in atom interferometry.

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Long-Range Interaction of Two Alkaline-Earth Atoms: Accurate Ab Initio Relativistic Calculations

Andrei Derevianko


ITAMP
60 Garden St., MS 14
Cambridge, MA 02138


Compared to well-studied alkali-metal atoms, *accurate*ab initio atomic structure calculations for alkaline-earth systems present additional challenges. Strong Coulomb repulsion of two valence electrons adds to the complexity of calculation.

A series of increasingly sophisticated ab initio relativistic atomic-structure calculations for
alkaline-earth atoms is presented. A number of properties is obtained. In particular, van der Waals interaction coefficients are calculated and compared to those reported in the literature.

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Strontium Trapping in a Vapor Cell

Alan Gallagher


JILA, NIST and U. of Colorado
Boulder, CO 80309

 

 Abstract PDF

Strontium is loaded from vapor into a resonance-line (461 nm) MOT, within a sapphire-windowed, poly-crystalline-alumina cell. The cell and magnetic-field coils are within an oven operated at ~300 C, while an external Sr reservoir and ion pump provide ~ 109/cm3 Sr density and a much lower background-gas density. Recycling lasers pump from the 53P0 and 53P2 states to 63S1, to prevent "shelved" atom loss that results from the 51P1Æ41D2Æ53P2,1 branching. The trapped-atom velocity distribution is probed with a frequency-stabilized, intercombination-line (689 nm) laser. An intensity-dependent temperature, that approaches the Doppler limit (TD) at low intensity, is observed for this structure-free transition that does not undergo polarization-gradient cooling. Trapped-atom lifetimes (tt ) of 0.1-1s are observed by switched loading. The shape of the loading transient, and the intensity and Sr-density dependence of tt, indicate that tt is primarily limited by Sr-Sr* collisional loss induced by the trapping beams. Measurements versus these parameters yield a trap-loss rate coefficient, per Sr and Sr*, k(n) @6x10-9cm3/s at ­40 MHz detuning, with about 30 % uncertainty due primarily to uncertainty in the trapped-atom density. This loss mechanism, which is roughly proportional to intensity, limits trapped-atom number to ~108and densities to ~1011/cm3. A calculation based on the semi-classical (Gallagher-Pritchard) model indicates that this loss results from exciting the 1Pgmolecular state, which has a high survival probability to small internuclear separation (R) since it does not radiate at close range. Excitation occurs at long range due to retardation of the coupling, so this provides an exceptionally efficient Sr-Sr* loss mechanism. The calculation, which includes this rapidly varying G(R) and the finite collision temperature, yields a k that is several times larger than the measured value. This model ignores bound states, and it is not clear if this is the cause of the discrepancy.


The magnetic field gradient is rapidly reduced and the blue laser is blocked to transiently load the ~1mK, resonance-line trapped atoms into an intercombination-line trap. About 50% transfer has been achieved with broad-band cooling, using a 789 nm laser that is spectrally-broadened to ~ 2MHz on the red wing of the transition. This produces an 20
mK cloud, which has been further cooled to ~5mK, or 30 TD, with 20 ms of single-frequency trapping at ­50 kHz detuning. In most cases trap temperatures are obtained from the spectral width (Dn) of intercombination-line fluorescence, effectively at zero magnetic field. However, at the lowest temperatures the contrast of Ramsey fringes from temporally separated p/2 pulses of near-resonant 689 nm light yielded the cloud velocity width, free of several factors that complicate the interpretation of very narrow Dn fluorescence widths.


The work reported here was carried out by Kurt Vogel and Timothy Dineen; details can be found in Kurt Vogel's university of Colorado thesis. Jan Hall also made essential contributions, and this work was supported by NSF.

 

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Creation of Ultra-Long-Range Rydberg Molecules in a MOT or Condensate

Chris H. Greene; A. S. Dickinson

JILA
University of Colorado
Boulder, CO 80309-0440

H. R. Sadeghpour

ITAMP
60 Garden Street, MS 14
Cambridge, MA 02138

Ultracold atoms at typical condensate temperatures and densities are ideally suited to the creation of long-range molecules, formed from one ground state atom and one highly excited atom. The adiabatic potential curves are highly oscillatory, with a peculiar appearance that resembles the atomic radial wavefunctions. In fact, two qualitatively different classes of molecular states can be formed. One class involves a low angular momentum Rydberg state and is nonpolar, while the other class involves high angular momentum and can form a permanent dipole moment in the kilodebye range. These molecular states should be observable as satellite lines in photoabsorption, which can be shifted away from an unperturbed atomic transition by frequencies in the 1 MHz - 10 GHz range.

*This work was supported by NSF.

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Production of Ultracold Metastable Calcium Ensembles
in a Bichromatic Magneto-Optic Trap

Andreas Hemmerich

Institut fuer Laser-Physik
Universitaet Hamburg
Jungiusstr.9
20355 Hamburg, Germany

Alkaline earth systems, provide extremely narrow optical transitions in the visible domain which appear interesting for many applications, e.g. time/frequency standards. Narrow lines also open the path for novel laser cooling schemes which allow for particularly low temperatures. I report on our project on laser cooling and trapping of metastable Calcium
atoms in a magneto-optic trap operating with bichromatic light.

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 Group II Atoms: A Cornucopia of Cold Collision Physics

Paul S. Julienne

Physics Laboratory
National Institute of Standards and Technology
100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8423
Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8423 USA

Group II atoms, such as Mg, Ca, Sr, or Br, and related species such asYb, offer a wealth of opportunities for studying cold collision physics. We have identified at least 20 different kinds of collision problems that can be studied using these systems. One prime motivation for using Group II species is the absence of hyperfine structure in the dominant isotopes. This greatly simplifies the theoretical treatment, and offers the possibility for studying
small-detuning trap loss processes that are still poorly understood for alkali systems. High-resolution photoassociative spectroscopy should also be feasible for these systems. Such spectroscopy should facilitate the construction of accurate potential curves for the molecular dimers, and has the potential to lead to accurate values for the sign and magnitude of the s-wave scattering lengths, which currently are completely unknown for these systems. This talk will consider the molecular physics and threshold scattering properties of Group II species, and describe some of the issues and challenges involved in applying photoassociative spectroscopy to them.

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Experiments with Ultracold Strontium Atoms


Hidetoshi Katori 1,2 , Tetsuya Ido 2 , and Makoto Kuwata-Gonokami 2


1 Engineering Research Institute

University of Tokyo

Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan


2 Cooperative Excitation Project

ERATO, JST, KSP-bldg. D842

3-2-1 Sakado, Kawasaki 213-0012, Japan


Telephone+81-44-819-2631

Fax+81-44-819-2633

e-mail: katori@amo.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp

 

PDF of Abstract


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Ab Initio Study of the Ground and First Excited Electronic States of the Strontium Dimer

S. Kotochigova, E. Tiesinga, and P. S. Julienne

National Institute of Standards and Technology
100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8401
Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899

 Abstract PDF



Recently we have successfully applied the relativistic ab initio valence bond method to calculate
W-dependent ground state potentials and C6 coefficients of Cs2 and Rb2 which compare well to other data. Now this approach is used to obtain electronic potential surfaces of Sr2. Interest in these potentials is fueled by experiments on ultra-cold strontium atoms. The scattering properties of interaction potentials will determine whether Bose-Einstein condensate can be obtained. Some spectroscopic data on the ground X1Sg+ potential is available and used to compare to our valence bond results. Long range dispersion coefficients C6 and C8 are evaluated from the theoretical potentials.

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Calculations on Cold Collisions Between Laser Cooled Alkaline Earth Atoms

Mette Machholm
Department of Computational Science
The National University of Singapore
Singapore 119260

Paul S. Julienne
National Institute for Standards and Technology
100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8423
Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8423

Kalle-Antti Suominen
Helsinki Institute of Physics, PL 9
FIN-00014 Helsingin yliopisto, Finland

Orsted Laboratory, NBIfAFG
University of Copenhagen
Universitetsparken 5
DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark

 Abstract PDF

A laser red-detuned from the 1P0-1S1 cooling transition will cause trap loss from a sample of laser cooled and trapped earth alkaline atoms via three mechanisms: two by excitation to the attractive molecular singlet states at long range (1Su+ and 1Pg) followed by state change (SC) to a triplet molecular states at short range. The third mechanism is radiative escape (RE) after excitation to the 1Su+-state at long range, and spontaneous decay at shorter range.

We use quantum scattering methods to calculate the light-induced collisional loss of laser-cooled and trapped magnesium atoms for detunings up to 50 atomic linewidths to the red of the 1S0-1P1 cooling transition. The major isotopes of the alkaline earth atoms have no hyperfine structure to complicate the theoretical studies. We evaluate both the RE and SC mechanisms of trap loss. The RE mechanism via the allowed 1Su excitation is dominant for more than about one atomic linewidth detuning. Molecular vibrational structure due to photoassociative transitions to bound states begins to appear beyond about ten linewidths detuning. The SC trap loss via excitation at long range to the 1Su+-state and coupling to a triplet state at short range shows the same features as the RE trap loss, but is about one order of magnitude smaller. The SC trap loss via excitation to the 1Pg-state is smaller than via the two other mechanisms, except at very small detuning. The 1Pg SC have vibrational and rotational structure even at small detunings.

For magnesium the short range molecular potentials are available, and show a simple structure, therefore we have chosen this system as our model system. Little is known about the short range molecular potentials for the other alkaline earth diatomics, and we simplify these systems by introducing one effective SC crossing. The coupling at the SC crossing is scaled by the magnitude of the fine-structure splitting of the 3P atomic state.

The quantum calculations include the 3-dimensional aspects of the collisions by summing over branches and partial waves, and take the effect of a finite temperature into account by thermal averaging over collisions energies. Except for uncertainties in the short range potentials and the SC coupling strength the trap loss spectra for Mg are complete. The modelling of the other species, allow us to discussed scaling of properties throughout the
group II and also for Yb.

The trap loss spectra presented are for a weak probe laser, therefore independent of the cooling laser. We span the temperature range from the Doppler limit for the 1S0-1P1 cooling and 3 orders of magnitude down covering also the temperatures reached by cooling on the
intercombination line.

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Experiments with Laser Cooled and Trapped 40Ca Atoms: Increased Trap Lifetimes and Optical Frequency Measurements

C. W. Oates, E. A. Curtis, and L. W. Hollberg


Time and Frequency Division

National Institute of Standards and Technology
325 Broadway

Boulder, CO 80303

We have been using diode lasers to cool and trap Ca atoms for use in an optical frequency standard based on the 657 nm intercombination line (natural linewidth = 400 Hz). We have constructed a compact magneto-optic trap with which we can load ~ 107 Ca atoms in a 20 ms loading time, which is limited by optical pumping through the 1D2 level to a dark state. Using a repumping diode at 672 nm to block this path, we have seen trap lifetimes longer than 200 ms, limited (we believe) by background collisions. With our trapped sample we have performed Bordé-Ramsey spectroscopy and have seen sub-natural linewidths as narrow as 200 Hz. Presently we are performing frequency measurements on the clock transition with a mode-locked laser system. This new measurement capability should enable detailed investigations of systematic shifts at near the Hz level, including those due to collisions between cold atoms.

 

Quench Cooling - Heading Towards Ultra-Cold
Temperatures with Magnesium Atoms

Ernst Rasel

Institut fuer Quantenoptik
Universitaet Hannover
30167 Hannover, Germany

We report on the present investigations on laser cooling of magnesium atoms. A further reduction of the temperature of the atoms is crucial with respect to future applications of magnesium as natural frequency reference in the optical domain. Our studies explore novel routes to reach atomic temperatures in the micro-kelvin regime. Using Sisyphus cooling or evaporative cooling sub-Doppler temperatures as low as 10 nano-kelvins have been achieved for alkali or noble gas atoms. Such techniques, however, cannot be used for (ground state) earth-alkali metals. New techniques taking advantage out of the spectroscopic features of earth-alkaline metals have to be developed. Possible schemes are based on narrow transitions, the life time of which is reduced by optical pumping, or cooling atoms in the long living metastable states. Our efforts are focused on both schemes.

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 Trapping and Cooling of Calcium: Achievements, Problems, Remedies and Applications

F. Riehle, G. Zinner, U. Sterr, T. Trebst, T. Binnewies, G. Wilpers, J. Helmcke
Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt
Bundesallee 100
D-38116 Braunschweig, Germany

E. Tiemann
Institut für Quantenoptik
Universität Hannover
Welfengarten 1
D-30167 Hannover, Germany

The exceptionally narrow intercombination lines 3P1 - 1S0 of the alkaline earth metals can be used for high-precision experiments in various fields. We have developed a laser stabilized to the intercombination transition of laser cooled 40 Ca atoms. This laser represents an optical frequency standard with a relative uncertainty of 2.5 x 10-13[1] that can be used to realize the SI unit of length, the meter with highest accuracy[2]. This application and others e.g. time-domain atom interferometry or photoassociation spectroscopy are hampered by the existence of a loss channel to the 1D2 state limiting the number of trapped atoms and by the high Doppler limit of the 1P1- 1S0 transition (423 nm) of about 1 mK.

When the leak to the metastable 1D2 state was closed by a repumping laser (672 nm) the storage time could be increased to allow for photoassociation spectroscopy of cold Ca atoms [3]. The observed Ca2 spectrum was used to identify the regular vibrational series characteristic of the 1/R3 asymptotic potential with the rotational substructure resolved for the deepest observed level.

A method was devised based on the narrow intercombination transition[4] that enabled us to reduce the velocity spread of the Ca atoms in one dimension close to the recoil limit. The method uses the repeated selection and accumulation of slow atoms from the pre-cooled atomic cloud and the repeated rethermalization of the remaining atoms. Atom interferences with such a prepared ensemble showed an increased visibility. To obtain lower velocities of Ca atoms in three dimensions, several methods are possible that are based on the narrow intercombination transition or on transitions from the excited states. Examples will be discussed at the workshop.

References

[1]   F. Riehle, H. Schnatz, B. Lipphardt, G. Zinner, T. Trebst, J. Helmcke, IEEE Trans. Instrum. Meas., IM 48, (1999), 613

[2]   T. J. Quinn, Metrologia 30 (1993/94) 523

[3]   G. Zinner, T. Binnewies, F. Riehle, E. Tiemann, to be published in Phys. Rev. Lett.

[4]   Tomas Binnewies, Uwe Sterr, Jürgen Helmcke, F. Riehle, Phys. Rev. A 62, (2000), 011601(R)

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 Spectroscopy and Potential Energy Curves of Mg2

William C. Stwalley

Department of Physics,
University of Connecticut

Storrs, CT

 

 Abstract PDF

The electronic spectroscopy of 24Mg2 was first studied by Balfour and Douglas1 in 1970. Shortly thereafter, the potential curve and long-range forces in the X 1Sg+ ground state were studied by Stwalley and Li.2,3 The implications of this and further work for the scattering lengths and potential BEC of 24Mg and 26Mg will be discussed.

 

Supported in part by the National Science Foundation.

1. W. J. Balfour and A. E. Douglas, Can. J. Phys. 48, 901 (1970).
2. W. C. Stwalley, Chem. Phys. Letters 7, 600 (1970).
3. K. C. Li and W. C. Stwalley, J. Chem. Phys. 59, 4423 (1973).

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Semiclassical and Quantum Theories on Cold Collisions Applied to Magnesium Atoms

Kalle-Antti Suominen

Department of Applied Physics
University of Turku
FIN-20014 Turun yliopisto, Finland

and

Helsinki Institute of Physics
PL 9
FIN-00014 Helsingin yliopisto, Finland

Alkaline earth atoms such as Mg, Ca and Sr have reasonably simple quasimolecule structures, which is expected to make it possible to test the prevailing trap loss theories against experimental data. The loss of atoms from traps in the presence of near-resonant light can be studied using either semiclassical or fully quantum mechanical models. I shall review the basic theoretical approaches and discuss the applicability of the semiclassical methods in the case of magnesium when the atoms are laser cooled using the 1P0-1S1 transition. A comparison between the semiclassical and quantum results indicates that around and below the Doppler cooling temperature (2 mK) the semiclassical theories fail to agree with the quantum results.

 

This work has been performed in collaboration with Mette Machholm (National
University of Singapore) and Paul Julienne (NIST, Gaithersburg).

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 Physics with Cold Magnesium Atoms

Jan W. Thomsen

Niels Bohr Institute
Oersted Laboratory
H.C.Oersted Institute
Universitetsparken 5
DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark

In Copenhagen we are currently investigating properties of cold magnesium atoms, especially collision properties. Most alkaline earth systems have a particularly simple level structure with no hyperfine structure. These systems are thus well suited for detailed quantitative quantum mechanical modeling [1] involving only a few potential curves in contrast to more complicated systems like, e.g., Na- Na with hundreds of potential curves in play. The magnesium atom has an additional advantage compared to other alkaline earth atoms, since no lower lying D-states are present close to the cooling transition.

We have recently constructed an experimental setup for cooling and trapping magnesium atoms using the 285.2 nm 1S - 1P transition[2]. We trap more than 106 atoms with a density of about 1010 atoms cm3. The MOT temperature is about 2 mK.

The first theoretical studies of loss mechanisms in the magnesium MOT has been carried out [1] and parallel experimental investigations are in progress.

 

[1] M. Machholm, K-A. Suominen and P.S. Julienne: Phys. Rev A 59 R4113 (1999)

[2] K. Sengstock, U. Sterr, J.H. Muller, V. Rieger, D. Bettermann, W. Ertmer: Appl. Phys. B 59 99 (1999)

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 Photoassociation of Cold Ca and Its Prospect to Cold Ca2 Molecules

1E. Tiemann, 2G. Zinner, 2T. Binnewies, 2F. Riehle

1Institut für Quantenoptik
Universität Hannover
Welfengarten 1
D-30167 Hannover, Germany

2Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt
Bundesallee 100
D-38116 Braunschweig, Germany

We will report on the first successful observation of photoassociation spectra of cold Ca. The experimental conditions and the theoretical analysis of the asymptotic potential are described. This is put into context with the existing molecular data and derived potentials
therefrom to learn about the possibilities to produce cold molecules or about cold collision properties which might be of importance for using cold Ca for an atomic clock.

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Schedule of Talks

 Thursday, September 7, 2000

 Chair: Hossein Sadeghpour

 8:30-9:00 a.m. P. Julienne: Welcome and introduction to workshop
 9:00-9:45 a.m. A. Gallagher: Strontium Trapping in a Vapor Cell
 9:45-10:30 a.m. H. Katori: Experiments with Ultracold Strontium Atoms
 10:30-11:00 a.m. Coffee
 11:00-11:45 a.m. J. W. Thomsen: Physics with Cold Magnesium Atoms
 11:45-2:00 p.m. Lunch

 Chair: Kate Kirby

 2:00-2:45 p.m.  M. Machholm: Calculations on Cold Collisions Between Laser Cooled Alkaline Earth Atoms
 2:45-3:30 p.m.  K.-A. Suominen: Semiclassical And Quantum Theories
On Cold Collisions Applied To Magnesium Atoms
 3:30-4:00 p.m.  Refreshments
 4:00-4:45 p.m.  E. Rasel: TBA
 4:45-5:30 p.m.  E. Tiemann: Photoassociation of Cold Ca and Its Prospect for Cold Ca2 Molecules

5:30 p.m. Reception in Perkin Lobby

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 Friday, September 8, 2000

 Chair: Kalle-Antti Suominen

 9:00-9:45 a.m. C. Oates: Experiments with Laser Cooled and Trapped 40Ca Atoms: Increased Trap Lifetimes and Optical Frequency Measurements
 9:45-10:30 a.m. F. Riehle: Trapping and Cooling of Calcium: Achievements, Problems, Remedies and Applications
 10:30-11:00 a.m. Coffee
 11:00-11:45 a.m. A. Hemmerich: Production of Ultracold Metastable Calcium
Ensembles in a Bichromatic Magneto-Optic Trap
 11:45-12:30 p.m. F. Cruz: A System for Cooling and Trapping of Calcium
 12:30-2:00 p.m. Lunch

 Chair: Alex Dalgarno

 2:00-2:45 p.m. C. Greene: Creation of Ultra-Long-Range Rydberg Molecules in a MOT or Condensate
2:45-3:30 p.m. A. Derevianko: Long-Range Interaction Of Two Alkaline-Earth Atoms: Accurate Ab Initio Relativistic Calculations
3:30-4:00 p.m. Refreshments
4:00-4:45 p.m. S. Kotochigova: Ab Initio Study of the Ground and First Excited Electronic States of the Strontium Dimer
4:45-5:30 p.m. Breakout discussion groups

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 Saturday, September 9, 2000

 Chair: Nils Andersen

9:00-9:45 a.m. W. C. Stwalley: Spectroscopy and Potential Energy Curves of Mg2
9:45-10:30 a.m. P. Julienne: Group II Atoms: A Cornucopia of Cold Collision Physics
10:30-11:00 a.m. Coffee
11:00-12:00 noon Wrapup discussions and summary

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