ITAMP Workshop

Physics and Applications of "Slow" Light

Organizers: Mikhail Lukin, Atac Imamoglu, Lene Hau

April 3-5, 2000

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 Participants

Abstracts

Schedule

Online Talks

Online Talks

Arimondo 

Berman

Boyd

Budker 

Fleischhauer

Gaeta

Gauthier

Grangier

Hemmer

Hillery

Imamoglu

Inguscio

Kocharovskaya

Lukin

Meystre

Mossberg

Parkins

Scully

Slusher

van Enk

Walmsley

Wright

 

Participants

Prof. Ennio Arimondo
INFM - Dipartimento di Fisica
Università di Pisa
Via F. Buonarroti 2
I-56125 Pisa, Italy
arimondo@difi.unipi.it

Prof. Paul R. Berman
Physics Department
Univ. of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1120
pberman@umich.edu

Prof. Robert W. Boyd
Institute of Optics
Wilmot 308
University of Rochester
Rochester, NY 14627
boyd@optics.rochester.edu

Prof. Dmitry Budker
Department of Physics
219 Birge
University of California
Berkeley, CA 94720-7300
budker@socrates.berkeley.edu

Prof. Raymond Y. Chiao
Department of Physics
565 Birge
University of California
Berkeley, CA 94720-7300
chiao@physics.berkeley.edu

Mr. Zachary Dutton
Department of Physics
Harvard University
Cambridge, MA 02138
dutton@fas.harvard.edu

Mr. Chris Fang-Yen
MIT Room 6-003
77 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA 02139
minwah@mit.edu

Prof. Michael S. Feld
George R. Harrison Spectroscopy Laboratory
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
77 Massachusetts Avenue, Room 6-014
Cambridge, MA 02139-4307
msfeld@mit.edu

Dr. Michael Fleischhauer
Sektion Physik
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen
Theresienstr. 37/III
D-80333 Muenchen, Germany
mfleisch@theorie.physik.uni-muenchen.de

Prof. Alexander L. Gaeta
Dept. of Applied and Engineering Physics
Cornell University
Ithaca, New York 14853-2501
alex.gaeta@cornell.edu


Prof. Daniel J. Gauthier
Room 139, Physics Bldg.
Duke University
Department of Physics
Box 90305
Durham, NC 27708
gauthier@phy.duke.edu

Prof. Philippe Grangier
Institut d'Optique
B.P. 147 - F91403
Orsay Cedex - France
philippe.grangier@iota.u-psud.fr

Prof. Lene Hau
Department of Physics
Harvard University
17 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
hau@physics.harvard.edu

Dr. Philip Hemmer
Air Force Research Laboratory
63 Scott Dr.
Hanscom, MA 01731
Philip.Hemmer@hanscom.af.mil

Prof. Mark S. Hillery
Dept of Physics
Hunter College
695 Park Avenue
New York, NY 10021
mhillery@shiva.hunter.cuny.edu

Prof. Atac Imamoglu
Department of Electrical &
Computer Engineering
University of California
Santa Barbara, CA 93106
atac@xanadu.ece.ucsb.edu

Prof. Massimo Inguscio
Università di Firenze
Department of Physics
largo E.Fermi 2
I50125 Firenze, Italy
inguscio@lens.unifi.it
 

Shin Inouye
Department of Physics
MI 77 Massachusetts Ave., 26-2555
Cambridge, MA 02139
sinouye@mit.edu

Prof. Wolfgang Ketterle
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Room 26-243
77 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02139-4307
wolfgang@amo.mit.edu

Prof. Mark A Kasevich
Department of Physics,
Yale University
P.O. Box 208120,
New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8120
mark.kasevich@yale.edu

Prof. Olga A. Kocharovskaya
Dept of Physics,
Texas A&M University
College Station, TX, 77843-4242
kocharovskaya@physics.tamu.edu

Dr. Mikhail Lukin
ITAMP
60 Garden Street, MS 14
Cambridge, MA 02138
mlukin@cfa.harvard.edu

Prof. Pierre Meystre
Optical Sciences Center,
The University of Arizona
Tucson, AZ 85721
pierre.meystre@optics.arizona.edu

Prof. Thomas W. Mossberg
Department of Physics,
University of Oregon
1371 E. 13th Ave
Eugene, Oregon 97403
twmoss@oregon.uoregon.edu

Dr. A. Scott Parkins
The University of Auckland
Department of Physics
Private Bag 92019
Auckland, New Zealand
s.parkins@auckland.ac.nz

Prof. Marlan O. Scully
Dept of Physics,
Texas A&M University
College Station, TX, 77843-4242
scully@physics.tamu.edu

Dr. Richart E. Slusher
Bell Laboratories
600 Mountain Avenue
Murray Hill, NJ 07974
res@bell-labs.com
 
Dr. Steven J. van Enk
Norman Bridge Laboratory of Physics
California Institute of Technology 12-33
Pasadena CA 91125
vanenk@its.caltech.edu
 
Dr. Benjamin T. Varcoe
Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik
Hans-Kopfermann-Str. 1
D-85748 Garching, Germany
B.Varcoe@mpq.mpg.de
 
Prof. Vladimir Velichanksy
Dept. of Physics,
Texas A&M Univ.
College Station, TX 77843-4242

Prof. Ian A. Walmsley
Institute of Optics
Universiy of Rochester
Wilmot 315
Rochester, NY 14627
walmsley@optics.rochester.edu

Prof. Yoshihisa Yamamoto
Ginzton Lab, Rm. #4
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305
yamamoto@loki.stanford.edu

 
Dr. Valeriy Yashchuk
Department of Physics
University of California
Berkeley, CA 94720-7300
yashchuk@socrates.berkeley.edu

Dr. Suzanne Yelin
ITAMP
60 Garden St., MS 14
Cambridge, MA 02138
syelin@cfa.harvard.edu

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Abstracts

Arimondo 

Berman

Boyd

Budker 

Chiao 

Feld

Fleischhauer

Gaeta

Gauthier

Grangier

Hemmer

Hillery

Imamoglu

Inguscio

Kocharovskaya

Lukin

Meystre

Mossberg

Parkins

Scully

Slusher

van Enk

Varcoe

Walmsley

Wright

Group Velocities in Atomic Systems Open or with Momentum Recoil

E. Arimondo

INFM, Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa
Via F. Buonarroti 2, I-56127 Pisa, Italy

The dispersive properties of coherent population trapping in an open three-level atomic system, i.e. in a system with losses towards external levels, are investigated. Electromagnetic induced transparency in an open three-level system produces very small group velocities, similar to those obtained in a closed three-level system. Furthermore, for cold atom, the momentum recoil associated to the photon absorption process leads to a kinetic energy mismatch between the states composing the dark state superposition, and it is equivalent to a coherence decay mechanism. The role of this kinetic energy decay mechanism on the propagation of slow light pulses through a cold atom sample has been
investigated numerically.

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Nonlinear Spectroscopy of Cold Atoms

P. R. Berman

Physics Department
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1120

Nonlinear spectroscopy has proven to be in invaluable tool for probing atomic and molecular systems. Processes such as lasing without inversion, electromagnetically induced transparency, index enhancement, and slow light find their origin in the nonlinear response of an atomic ensemble to two or more radiation fields. For most applications, the recoil atoms undergo on the absorption or emission of radiation could be neglected in conventional nonlinear spectroscopy. The situation has changed dramatically with the availability of cold atom sources and Bose condensates. It is now possible for atom recoil to modify and lead to new features in pump-probe spectroscopy of two and three-level atoms. The simplest manifestation of this effect is the so-called ''recoil-induced resonances.'' The physical processes underlying recoil-induced resonances will be reviewed and a comparison between the recoil-induced resonances and the collective atomic recoil laser will be given. Examples of recoil-induced structure in both steady-state and coherent transient spectroscopy will be explored. Among the topics to be discussed are pump-probe spectroscopy of a single transition, pump-probe spectroscopy of three-level systems, matter-wave atom interferometers, Bragg spectroscopy of a single ground state level, and a recoil-induced Faraday effect.

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 EIT and Slow Light in the Two-Level Atom

Robert W. Boyd

Institute of Optics
University of Rochester
Rochester, NY 14627

We show how EIT concepts, which were initially developed within the context of a multilevel atomic system, can be implemented for the two-level atom. We find that the presence of a strong control field can modify the linear and nonlinear optical response of the two-level atom. In particular, we find that the presence of the control field can induce conditions such that the linear absorption vanishes identically but the nonlinear response is large. We also find that the group velocity of light is much smaller than the velocity of light in vacuum under these conditions. In addition, we describe several possible applications of EIT in the two-level atom, including the generation of squeezed light and the generation of spatial and temporal solitons.

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 New Developments in Nonlinear Optical Rotation

D. Budker, D. F. Kimball, S. M. Rochester, and V. V. Yashchuk

Department of Physics
University of California at Berkeley
Berkeley CA 94720-7300

This talk will dwell on recent work at Berkeley on nonlinear optical rotation in resonant atomic media, including magneto-optical, electro-optical and self-rotation. A previously unrecognized physical mechanism is shown to play a dominant role in magneto-optical rotation at high light powers.

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 Bogoliubov Dispersion Relation for a "Photon Fluid'': Is This a Superfluid?

Raymond Y. Chiao

Department of Physics
University of California
Berkeley, California 94720-7300

We discuss the possibility that photons, which are bosons, can form a 2D superfluid due to Bose-Einstein condensation inside a nonlinear Fabry-Perot cavity filled with atoms in their ground states. A "photon fluid'' forms inside the cavity as a result of multiple photon-photon collisions mediated by the atoms during a cavity ring-down time. The effective mass and chemical potential for a photon inside this fluid are nonvanishing. This implies the existence of a Bogoliubov dispersion relation for the low-lying elementary excitations of the photon fluid, and in particular, that sound waves exist for long-wavelength, low-frequency disturbances of this fluid. Possible experiments to test for the superfluidity of the photon fluid based on the Landau critical-velocity criterion will be discussed.

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 Nonclassical Behavior of the Microlaser

Chris M. Fang-yen, Abdulaziz Aljalal, Chung-Chieh Yu, Ramachandra R.
Dasari, and Michael S. Feld

George R. Harrison Spectroscopy Laboratory
MIT
Cambridge, MA
E-mail: msfeld@mit.edu

Fundamental study of the microlaser is important and interesting because it is one of the simplest systems in which experimental results can be rigorously compared with theoretical predictions. Furthermore, it is a quantum mechanical system, which can generate nonclassical light. Several measurements are underway to study the photon statistics inside and outside the cavity, the multiple threshold behavior, and the lineshape of microlaser emission. Interestingly, some quantum mechanical features are predicted to be present even when the number of atoms in the cavity is well beyond one. An overview of the current experimental and theoretical studies will be given.

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 Dark-State Polaritons, Quantum Memories for Photons and Entanglement of Atomic Ensembles

Michael Fleischhauer

Sektion Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians Universität München,
Theresienstr.37, D-80333 München, Germany

Mikhail Lukin

ITAMP, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics,
60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

A method for a controlled transfer of quantum states from light pulses to collective
atomic excitations and vice versa is discussed. The technique is based on the existence of
form-stable coupled excitations of light and matter ("dark-state polaritons'') associated with the propagation of quantum fields in Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT). The properties of dark-state polaritons such as the group velocity are determined by the mixing angle between light and matter components and can be controlled by an external coherent field. In particular, light pulses can be decelerated and stopped in which case shape and quantum state of the field are mapped onto metastable atomic Raman coherences in which they can be stored. Reaccelerating the dark-state polaritontransfers the stored quantum state back to a light field. A similar state transfer between travelling-wave light fields and atomic excitations is possible when an EIT medium is placed inside an optical resonator. Such a system resembles an ideal quantum memory for light, which in contrast to single-atom cavity QED does not require a strong coupling regime. Trapping correlated photons in different cavities allows to entangle spatially separated atomic ensembles.

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 Coherent Control of Optical Solitons

K. D. Moll and Alexander L. Gaeta

School of Applied and Engineering Physics
Cornell University
Ithaca, NY 14853

We investigate theoretically the use of quantum interference effects to control the dispersion and nonlinearity of an atomic system. We find under suitable conditions that it is possible to produce temporal solitons under conditions that are highly absorbing in the absence of a
control field. We also discuss the possibility of forming spatial and spatio-temporal solitons in such a system.

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 Slow Light and the Vacuum Rabi Splitting

Daniel J. Gauthier

Duke University
Department of Physics
Durham, NC 27708

The vacuum Rabi splitting appears as doublet in the spontaneous emission spectrum of a two-level atom enclosed in a single mode optical cavity in the strong coupling regime.
It also appears in the weak-probe-beam transmission spectrum of the coupled atom-cavity system and can be enhanced by having many atoms in the cavity. The vacuum Rabi splitting can be interpreted as a purely quantum mechanical effect arising from the Rabi splitting of the atomic transition due to its interaction with the vacuum field. It also can
be interpreted as a purely classical effect arising from the linear dispersion of the atom that splits the cavity resonance [see Zhu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., Vol. 64, p. 2499 (1990)]. Taking the latter view point, it might be expected that the quantum interference effects giving rise to slow light propagation might have a dramatic effect on the weak-probe-beam transmission spectrum of a collection of atoms strongly coupled to a single mode cavity. I will review the classical interpretation of the vacuum Rabi splitting in terms of
linear-dispersion theory and describe how to generalize this approach for a multi-level atom. I will also show that the atom-cavity transmission spectrum contains a new
feature arising from the large dispersion associated with slow light propagation.

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 Quantum Non-Demolition Measurements and Squeezing in Lambda-Type Atomic Three-Level Systems

Philippe Grangier and Alice Sinatra

Laboratoire Charles Fabry de l'Institut d'Optique,
BP 147, 91403 Orsay Cedex, France

We will review QND and quantum noise reduction experiments based upon the large optical non linearities available in atomic 3-level systems [1]. In the weak coupling regime, interesting effects are obtained when large atomic cooperativities are achieved, by using low-finesse cavities, large number of atoms, and moderate atom-laser detunings [2]. We will discuss possible extensions of previous schemes to "giant" non-linearities,
obtained very close to the dark state resonance condition in a lambda-type3-level system [3].
----------__________________

[1] J.F. Roch, K. Vigneron, Ph. Grelu, A. Sinatra, J.Ph. Poizat and
Ph. Grangier, Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 634 (1997)

[2] A. Sinatra, J.F. Roch, K. Vigneron, Ph. Grelu, J.-Ph. Poizat, K. Wang
and Ph. Grangier, Phys. Rev. A 57, 2980-2995 (1998)

[3] K. Gheri, W. Alge and Ph. Grangier, Phys. Rev. A 60, R2673 (1999)

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 Applications and Prospects for Electromagnetically InducedTransparency in Solids

Dr. Philip Hemmer

Air Force Research Laboratory
63 Scott Dr.
Hanscom, MA 01731

Recent experimental and theoretical work has revealed numerous potential applications for electromagnetic induced transparency and other dark-resonance techniques. Although it has been possible to perform impressive demonstration experiments in atomic vapors, many applications will ultimately require solid-state implementation. Our initial experiments toward this goal involved the use of a low-temperature, spectral hole burning material: Pr doped Y2SiO5. The successes and limitations of this material will be reviewed in the context of particular applications that we are pursuing: optical aberration correction, optical memory, and quantum computing. In this same context, the properties of several additional material systems (color centers, phosphors, doped fibers, quantum wells), now under study in our laboratory, will be discussed. The status of the current experiments and some preliminary results will also be presented.

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 Quantum Fields in Nonlinear and Dispersive Media

Prof. Mark S. Hillery

Department of Physics
Hunter College
New York, NY 10021

There are several different ways to approach the quantization of electrodynamics in linear or nonlinear media. If there is no dispersion one can represent the medium by its susceptibilities and apply canonical quantization procedures. If the medium is dispersive, its response to fields is not local in time, and this introduces problems in the quantization. One approach is to construct an approximate theory which is local, and another is to introduce a model for the medium and to quantize the combined medium-field system. The latter approach is discussed here. Ultimately one would like a scattering theory for fields propagating through media, and it is shown how this can be done for linear, dispersive media.

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 Quantum Optics Using Quantum Dots

Atac Imamoglu

Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering
University of California
Santa Barbara, CA 93106

I will report experimental results demonstrating photon antibunching from a single CdSE quantum dot at room temperature. I will also discuss cavity-QED experiments using quantum dots embedded in microdisk structures: these experiments provide evidence for laser action even though the average number of quantum dots inside the cavity mode is unity.

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Coherent Matter And Electromagnetic Fields:Collective Dynamics Of Rf Atom Lasers

P. Maddaloni, M. Modugno, C. Fort, F. Minardi, and M. Inguscio

INFM - European Laboratory For Non Linear Spectroscopy (L.E.N.S.) - Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita' di Firenze L.go E. Fermi 2,1-50125 Firenze, Italy

One of the most successful results recently achieved in atomic physics is the realization of the so called atom laser. The interaction of a Rf field with a trapped Bose condensate is used to extract a coherent matter-wave beam. Although atomic condensates and laser light share many properties, Bose-condensed atoms are distinguished from photons in a laser by their interactions. As a consequence, the mechanism of out-coupling, perturbing the chemical potential, itself induces oscillations in the shape of the atom laser.

We report both theoretical and experimental studies concerning these collective effects in different regimes.

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 Dressed Bose-Einstein Condensates

Pierre Meystre

Optical Sciences Center
University of Arizona
Tucson, AZ 85721

High-Q multimode optical resonators can be used to generate dressed Bose-Einstein condensates, which are effective multicomponent condensates. We first discuss the generation and stability of these systems, and then combine them with ideas of "dark-state physics" to generate a full quantum entanglement between two matter waves and two optical waves. This offers a potential way to influence the behavior of a macroscopic quantum system via a microscopic "knob."

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 Group Velocity Effects in Linear Optical Systems and Maximal Light-Matter Coupling

Thomas W. Mossberg

Department of Physics and Oregon Center for Optics
University of Oregon
Eugene, Oregon 97403

Propagation of light through various optical devices, fiber gratings, fabry-perots, etc. will be analyzed in the context of slow light as will maximal atom-photon coupling obtainable with focused traveling wave optical beams in the absence of extreme group velocity effects.

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 Entangling and Teleporting Atomic Wavepackets

Scott Parkins

The University of Auckland
Department of Physics
Auckland, New Zealand

We outline schemes for entangling and teleporting atomic center-of-mass wave functions between distant locations. The schemes use interactions in cavity quantum electrodynamics to facilitate a coupling between the motion of an atom trapped inside a cavity and external propagating light fields. This enables the distribution of quantum entanglement and facilitates motional Bell-state analysis.

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 Slow Light Pulse Propagation in Periodic Dielectric Waveguides

R.E.Slusher


Lucent Technologies

Light pulses propagate at low velocities through periodic dielectric waveguides and dielectric waveguide resonator arrays in both the linear and nonlinear pulse intensity regimes. Experiments in fiber Bragg gratings demonstrate some of the interesting phenomena including Bragg solitons, vector solitons, polarization instabilities, and propagation in chirped gratings. Numerical simulations using the nonlinear coupled mode equations as well as coupled nonlinear Schröedinger equations are used to compare with the experimental results and to design new dielectric structures that exhibit a wide range of interesting phenomena. Experiments are also being designed for waveguide resonators.

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 Quantum Communication Using Cavity-QED

S.J. van Enk (1), H.J. Kimble (1), H. Mabuchi (1), J.I. Cirac (2), P.
Zoller (2)

(1) Norman Bridge Laboratory of Physics
California Institute of Technology 12-33
Pasadena, California 91125

(2) University of Innsbruck
6020 Innsbruck, Austria

Quantum mechanics promises to provide, under appropriate conditions, secure communication, more efficient communication and faster computation. Here we present a physical set-up that combines quantum memories (atoms) with quantum communication (photons): atoms trapped in optical cavities.

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 Creation of Fock States in the Micromaser

B.T.H. Varcoe, S. Brattke, and H. Walther

Max-Planck-Institute for Quantum Optics and
Sektion Physik der Universität München
85748 Garching Germany
Tel. +49/89 32905-704
Fax +49/89 32905-710
e-mail:
B.Varcoe@ mpq.mpg.de

The one-atom maser or micromaser allows one to study the resonant interaction of a single atom with a single mode of a superconducting niobium cavity. In our experiments we achieve values of the quality factor of up to 4x1010, corresponding to an average lifetime of a photon in the cavity of 0.3 s. The photon lifetime is thus much longer than the interaction time of an atom with the maser field. The atoms used in the experiments are rubidium Rydberg atoms pumped by laser excitation into the upper maser level, 63 P3/2, the lower maser level is either the 61 D5/2 or the 61 D3/2 depending on the cavity frequency. The atom field dynamics is observed by measuring the atoms in the upper or lower maser levels after the cavity. During the interaction the field in the cavity consists only of single or a few photons, nevertheless, it is possible to study the interaction in detail. Thus, the dynamics of the interaction described by the Jaynes-Cummings model can be controlled by changing the velocity i.e. the interaction time of the atoms. The atom rate is such that on average there is much less than a single atom in the cavity at one time. During the interaction with the cavity the atom and field become entangled, therefore the detection of the state of an outgoing atom gives information on the field states of the cavity.

The quantum mechanical treatment of the radiation field uses the number of photons in a particular mode, known as a number state or Fock state, to characterise the quantum states. Fock states therefore represent the most basic quantum states and are maximally distant from what one would call a classical field. Additionally and unlike the classical field, the quantum field has a ground state which is represented by a vacuum state consisting of field fluctuations with no residual energy. Experimentally Fock states are very fragile and very difficult to realise, hence so far they have not been produced experimentally under steady state conditions. To observe a Fock state, the mode considered must have minimal losses and the thermal field, always present at finite temperatures giving rise to photon number fluctuations, has to be eliminated. In this paper we are going to report on the first generation of Fock states using the micromaser. In order to produce the field, a flux of excited state atoms is passed through the cavity. The Fock states were realised in two ways: firstly in the steady state by using the trapping condition of the maser field[1] and secondly using state reduction of the pumping atoms. In the second experiment the purity of the Fock state could be investigated in detail by sending an additional probe atom into the cavity and investigating the dynamics of the photon exchange[2].

M. Weidinger, B. T. H. Varcoe, R. Heerlein, and H. Walther: "Trapping states in the micromaser." Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 3795 (1999).
B. T. H. Varcoe, S. Brattke, M. Weidinger and H. Walther: "Preparation of pure photon number states of the radiation field." Nature, 403 17 Feb. (2000).

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 Engineering Entanglement in Ultrafast Parametric Downconversion.

R. Erdmann, A. U'Ren, K. Banaszek,* I. A. Walmsley

The Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627

* Also with: Rochester Theory Center for Optical Science and Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627

We report an experimental confirmation of an interferometric technique for entangling two photons in the space-frequency component of the state vector by coherently adding the contributions from two passes through a down-conversion crystal. The resulting symmetrized state vector also contains very little distinguishing information that could cause the failure of a Bell-state measurement. Advances in the characterization of entanglement through Schmidt decomposition, in which the two-photon state vector is expressed as a discretized sum over the so-called Schmidt modes, are presented with particular emphasis on the quantification of entanglement through a suitably defined entropy. We discuss an experiment in which a KTP quasi-phase-matched (QPM) waveguide is used as a source of pairs of photons (replacing the down-conversion crystal) with a resulting improved control of the spatial characteristics of the modes, as well as the possibility for engineering particular entangled states.

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 Quantum Solitons Effects Using EIT

Ewan M. Wright

Optical Sciences Center
University of Arizona
Tucson, AZ 85721

In this talk I shall give an overview of quantum solitons in nonlinear optics, and build upon this to show how EIT enhanced nonlinearity permits the study of a new regime of quantum soliton effects, including collapses and revivals of the mean field, and fermionization of a number state light field in a 1D waveguide.

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Schedule

 Monday, April 3: Phillips Auditorium

9:00 a.m. Coffee; pick up workshop packets and nametags

9:25 a.m. Welcome; opening comments, Kate Kirby

Session I: 'Slow' Light and Nonlinear Optics with EIT

9:35 a.m. Z. Dutton/L. Hau: TBA

10:10 a.m. Coffee break

10:40 a.m. E. Arimondo: Group Velocities in Atomic Systems Open or with Momentum Recoil


11:15 a.m. R. Boyd: EIT and Slow Light in the Two-Level Atom

11:50 a.m. D. Budker: New Developments in Nonlinear Optical Rotation

12:25 p.m. Lunch

Session II: Quantum Effects and Entanglement

2:00 p.m. M. Scully: Quantum Noise Suppression Via Atomic Coherence Effects

2:35 p.m. P. Grangier: Quantum Non-Demolition Measurements and Squeezing in Lambda-Type Atomic Three-Level Systems

3:10 p.m. Refreshment break

3:30 p.m. S. van Enk: Quantum Communication Using Cavity-QED

4:05 p.m. M. Fleischhauer: Dark-State Polaritons, Quantum Memories for Photons and Entanglement of Atomic Ensembles

4:40 p.m. M. Lukin: Slow Group Velocities, Enhanced Nonlinearities and Entanglement of Light and Matter: What Is So Unique About EIT?



5:30-6:30 p.m.: Reception in Perkin Lobby

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 Tursday, April 4: PhillipsAuditorium

Session III: Optical Coherence in Solid State Media

9:00 a.m. R. Slusher: Slow Light Pulse Propagation in Periodic Dielectric Waveguides

9:35 a.m. A. Imamoglu: Quantum Optics Using Quantum Dots

10:10 a.m. Coffee

10:30 a.m. P. Hemmer: Applications and Prospects for Electromagnetically Induced Transparency in Solids

11:15 a.m. Lunch

Session IV: EIT and Nonlinear Optics in Fundamental Physics

2:00 p.m. O. Kocharovskaya: Freezing Light: Ultra-Slow Eit-Polariton with Vanishing or Negative Group Velocity

2:35 p.m. A. Gaeta: Coherent Control of Optical Solitons

3:10 p.m. Refreshment break

3:30 p.m. R. Chiao: Bogoliubov Dispersion Relation for a "Photon Fluid'': Is This a Superfluid?

4:15 p.m. M. Hillery: Quantum Fields in Nonlinear and Dispersive Media

4:50 p.m. T. Mossberg: Group Velocity Effects in Linear Optical Systems and Maximal Light-Matter Coupling

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 Wednesday, April 6: Phillips Auditorium

Session V: Dark States in Cavity QED and Cold Atoms

9:00 a.m. D. Gauthier: Slow Light and the Vacuum Rabi Splitting

9:35 a.m. Ch.Fang-Yen/ M.Feld: Nonclassical Behavior of the Microlaser

10:10 a.m. Coffee

10:40 a.m. B. Varcoe: Creation of Fock States in the Micromaser

11:15 a.m. I. Walmsley: Engineering Entanglement in Ultrafast Parametric Downconversion

11:50 a.m. M. Inguscio: Coherent Matter And Electromagnetic Fields: Collective Dynamics Of Rf Atom Lasers

12:25 p.m. Lunch

2:00 p.m. M. Kasevich: TBA

2:35 p.m. P. Meystre: Dressed Bose-Einstein Condensates

3:10 p.m. Refreshment break

3:30 p.m. S. Parkins: Entangling and Teleporting Atomic Wavepackets

4:05 p.m. P. Berman: Nonlinear Spectroscopy of Cold Atoms

4:40 p.m. S. Inouye/W. Ketterle: Optical Properties of a Dressed Bose-Einstein Condensate

5:15 p.m. Closing Remarks

 

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