Scott J. Kenyon: Animations/Videos
 

Animations are the heart of numerical simulations. Although graphs and statistics quantify the results of a simulation, animations and videos let us show results in a dramatic way that makes the results clear. To view the videos, click on the images.

The movies are 5-10 MB and may take awhile to load and run.

Solar System

Debris disks

Debris disks are the dusty remains of planet formation. When Earth-mass or larger planets form, they leave behind bright rings and disks of dust that shine from reflected light from the central star. Each video shows how the disk evolves with time. The clock goes around once in a billion years. The disk extends from 30 AU (orbit of Neptune) to 150 AU.

GMT debris disk video

Debris disk with strong planetesimals

GMT debris disk video

Debris disk with weak planetesimals

GMT debris disk video

Debris disk with several rings

Supercomputing 2005

JPL showed this video at SC2005. Watch for the planet: a small white blob within a dark ring in the lower right corner of the disk.

GMT debris disk video

Debris disk with a molten Earth-like planet

GMT animations

These videos show what the GMT might detect from a debris disk around a nearby star. The box is 1 arcsec on each side.

GMT debris disk video

Face-on debris disk with no atmosphere

GMT debris disk video

Face-on debris disk with adaptive optics

GMT debris disk video

Edge-on debris disk with no atmosphere

GMT debris disk video

Edge-on debris disk with adaptive optics

 

A close encounter between the Sun and another star makes Sedna-like orbits.
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