Research Interests

My primary research interests are the solar wind and solar corona. I seek to understand the coronal heating problem and the mechanisms that can accelerate the slow and fast components of the solar wind.

I am also interested in the dynamics of the outer Solar System and the impact histories of our nearest neighbors, the Moon and Mars.

Current Project(s)

Fall 2011 to present, with Steven R. Cranmer (SAO):
Research Exam project, working title: "Exploring the realms of turbulent solar wind acceleration: A magnetic field parameter study"

Previous Projects

Spring 2010 to Spring 2011, with Douglas P. Hamilton (UMD):
I worked on the mystery of Uranus' extreme 98 degree tilt for my senior honors thesis at University of Maryland. We sought a non-linear secular resonance that Uranus may have passed through during the evolution of the early Solar System. This work won the physics department's Honors Thesis Award in 2011, and will be continued.

Summer 2010, with Leonard Strachan (SAO):
This project, through the National Science Foundation's REU program, was my introduction to solar physics research. I worked on comparing 3D solar wind and corona models with data from the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer on the SOHO spacecraft. My work was included in my advisor's presentation at Fall AGU Meeting 2010: Testing Coronal and Solar Wind MHD Models with UV Spectroscopic and Visible Light Coronagraph Data (Link to ADS).

Fall 2008 to Spring 2011, with Herbert Frey (GSFC):
I worked as a part-time research assistant in the Planetary Geodynamics Lab at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. During my time there, I studied the Arabia Terra region of Mars, the dichotomy boundary of Mars (see pages 18-25 of Scientific Terrapin, Vol. 2, Iss. 1), and the Moscoviense region of the Moon.

Spring 2008, with Daniel Kirk-Davidoff (UMD):
I worked on editing and reformatting an educational website on the Messinian Salinity Crisis. This included researching topics (e.g. Desiccation Today).