Events for the Public

The Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics sponsors a variety of free programs for the public. Among these events are Observatory Nights held on the third Thursday of the month (excluding June, July and August). Observatory Nights feature a nontechnical lecture and telescopic observing from the observatory roof if weather permits. The lectures are intended for high-school age and older audiences but children are also welcome. We also sponsor a variety of other special observing events throughout the year. No reservations are necessary, but seating is limited to the auditorium's capacity. Admission is free.

These events--unless otherwise noted--are held in Phillips Auditorium (at the rear of the CfA complex near Madison Street and large parking lot), 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, about 1 mile west of Harvard Square. Parking lots marked for Observatory Staff are open to the public on event nights. Parking is free.

The Observatory does not host private events.

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Monthly Observatory Night
Thursday, March 19, 2015
7:30 pm: Mapping the Universe
Daniel Eisenstein

Galaxies are not scattered randomly throughout the universe. Instead, they group into stringy filaments that span hundreds of millions of light-years. How did such structure evolve from the bland primordial soup that followed the Big Bang? New clues are coming from an ambitious mapping project, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, which has measured the distance to galaxies halfway across the observable universe. Daniel Eisenstein is director of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) and a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

public night image
Monthly Observatory Night
Thursday, April 16, 2015
7:30 pm: Astronomy in the Year 2020
Jeff McClintock

Travel into the future for a preview of the Giant Magellan Telescope. This cathedral-sized telescope perched on a Chilean mountaintop will, like Star Trek's Enterprise, take us where no one has gone before. Stunning developments in optics technology will deliver images 10 times sharper than those of the Hubble Space Telescope. The Center for Astrophysics is not only a founding partner in this grand endeavor, but also is building the premier first-light instrument that will study other earths, the first stars, and the origin of our universe. Jeff McClintock is a senior astrophysicist at the CfA and a lecturer in the Harvard University Astronomy Department.

public night image
Monthly Observatory Night
Thursday, May 21, 2015
7:30 pm: Black Hole: How an Idea Abandoned by Newtonians, Hated by Einstein, and Gambled on by Hawking Became Loved
Marcia Bartusiak

For more than half a century, physicists and astronomers engaged in heated dispute over the possibility of black holes in the universe. The weirdly alien notion of a space-time abyss from which nothing escapes - not even light - seemed to confound all logic. This engrossing book tells the story of the fierce black hole debates and the contributions of Einstein, Hawking, and other leading thinkers who completely altered our view of the cosmos. Marcia Bartusiak's numerous works include The Day We Found the Universe, Archives of the Universe, and Einstein's Unfinished Symphony.